Tagawa, M. & Iwatsuki, K., 1979. is an important plant of traditional systems of medicine. A newly published study highlights the importance of medicinal plants that thrive on the ancestral lands of the Manobo Indigenous group in the southern Philippines. In the treatment of headaches, Angiopteris evecta is used in both Yap and Meghalaya. If you would like to support this site, please consider, Spore formation on the underside of the leaves, Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. Title Dictionary of Economic Plants. Angiopteris evecta (king fern) Used in traditional medicine: Yes Yes Shil and Choudhury, 2009: Annona reticulata (bullock's heart) Plant parts known to have folkloric medicinal uses: Yes Hanelt et al., 2001; Jansen et al., 1991; UK Natural History Museum, 2014: … Angiopteris evecta is naturally found from the Northern Territory to the east coast from Queensland to north-east New south Wales in Australia. Elsewhere it is sometimes naturalized, e.g. Angiopteris evecta : King Fern: paku gajah: Marattiaceae : King Fern: Angiopteris evecta . Angiopteris evecta root is chewed for dysentery in the Buin area and its leaves are used to treat colds in the Siwai region. ).J Farm Indones. 0 Angiopteris evecta grows best in moist and warm habitats with the annual mean temperature ranging from 19°C to 27°C, and annual precipitation ranging from 1000 mm to 5447 mm. Last update on 2019-06-13: Now containing 11906 plants. My field work … A. evecta is not cultivated commercially and no international trade exists. According to the results of MIC (Minimum Inhibitory Concentration) and RPI (Relative Percentage Inhibition) values, Angiopteris evecta could be used as potential plant for the management of pathogenic bacteria, X. c. pv. The starchy stipules of A. evecta have been eaten in times of starvation in Papua New Guinea and have been used for brewing alcohol, the young leaves are eaten in Ambon and croziers as an ingredient of stew in the Philippines. It is also found in New Guinea, Malaysia and Polynesia in south-east Asia growing along water courses in the understory of rainforests from sea level to an altitude of 1,500 m (4,921 ft). Chr. Some authors consider all described species as variations of only one species A. evecta . Guide to Philippine flora and fauna. The medicinal value of parts of A. evecta that are used in traditional medicine may merit further pharmaceutical investigation. It … Angiopteris evecta, commonly known as the giant fern, is a rare plant [citation needed] occurring in eastern and northern Australia and the Malay Peninsula.Also found growing in nearby islands such as Borneo, Sumatra, New Guinea and various places in Polynesia, Melanesia and Madagascar. in beverage, Edible Raw, Miscellaneous, plants, Vegetable. Vol. The prospects for ornamental use of A. evecta are good. Government Printing Office, Singapore. A newly published study highlights the importance of medicinal plants that thrive on the ancestral lands of the Manobo Indigenous group in the southern Philippines. Find the perfect angiopteris evecta stock photo. Smith and Hedychium coronarium Koenig, and the leaves of Kaempferia galanga L. The rhizome is chewed together with ginger and betel to treat spitting blood, especially if caused by poisoning. Rhizome short, fleshy, massive, erect, forming a clump up to 1 m tall and 0.5(-1) m in diameter, partly concealed by persistent fleshy stipules of previous and present leaves. In Papua New Guinea, leaves are bound to fractured limbs to aid healing and the mucilage from the leaves is also applied to the body to reduce high fevers; fresh leaves are used as a poultice for stomach-ache. The pounded stem is used as an ingredient for cough medicine and the stipules as a poultice for abdominal pain. Leaves droop dramatically under drought stress and the fern does not tolerate dry conditions. The present study has been designed to assess the medicinal uses of 51 Pteridophyte species belongs to 28 families on the basis of field surveys and taxonomic identification of plants used by tribals of the Arunachal Pradesh of North Eastern India in their traditional methods of treatment of various diseases, and ailments like stomach disorders, poisonous bites, rheumatics cough, asthma, fever, diabetes, etc. Swollen caudex used as starvation food in highland and low land areas of Papua New Guinea. Vol. Natural Resources Management Center, Ministry of Natural Resources and University of the Philippines, Goodwill Bookstore, Manila, The Philippines. It often occurs on shady stream and river banks or steep clay slopes, along trails and edges of open areas in the forest, from sea-level up to 1200 m altitude. The starchy stipules of A. evecta have been eaten in times of starvation in Papua New Guinea and have been used for brewing alcohol, the young leaves are eaten in Ambon and croziers as an ingredient of stew in the Philippines. Publication Author Uphof. In Siberut (Indonesia) a decoction of the leaves of A. evecta and Diplazium esculentum (Retz.) Accepted scientific name of each plant Frequency that search term appears in medicinal plant literature; Angiopteris evecta (G.Forst.) Scientific name used in medicinal reference All names Medicinal plant references; Angiopteris evecta (G.Forst.) A germinating spore of A. evecta produces a flat, large, glabrous, dark green gametophyte (prothallus) up to several cm long and resembling an anthocerotoid liverwort. It usually takes three years after planting before it starts production, and eight years before economic yield can begin. Vegetative propagation through the growth of adventitious buds on the stipules is very effective and may be seen in wild plants whose stipules have been damaged by foraging pigs. The gametophyte is mycorrhizal and assumed to be as slow growing and long-lived in the wild as it is in cultivation. Forest Herbarium, Royal Forest Department, Bangkok, Thailand. In: Smitinand, T., Larsen, K. (Series editors): Flora of Thailand. Introduced in gardens outside its natural distribution area, A. evecta is known to escape easily and grows from spores transported over large distances (over 50 km) when the climate is favourable. Ken Fern, However there are breeds like the dwarf cashew tree t… I am particularly interested in macroevolutionary rates and characters that diagnose large clades of ferns and lycophytes. Sword Fern’s Secret by DEANE. A. evecta is a terrestrial fern belongs to family Maratiaceae and commonly called as giant fern or king fern. In South-East Asia most specimens belong to A. evecta , with pinnules usually 2.5 cm wide and the recurrent veins not translucent beyond the sori. The original A. evecta was found in Tahiti. c which is known to cause diseases on many vegetables and cash crops particularly Centella asiatica. 28-30. Michael Sundue. Forst.) The fronds can grow up to 7m in length. Its typical climatic range was found to include The first leaves borne by the sporophyte are fan-shaped, later ones are pinnate, mature leaves are bipinnate.