"God built me for this job," Heemeyer said in the first recording. Heemeyer unsuccessfully appealed the decision, claiming the construction blocked access to his shop. In certain circles, 4 June marks the anniversary of “Killdozer Day,” a 2004 rampage in the city of Granby, Colorado, that damaged more than a dozen buildings and left one person (Heemeyer) dead. 4 June 2014. It features blow-by-blow re-creations of the events leading up to that widely publicized day in which Heemeyer destroyed half of that tourist-friendly Colorado mountain town with a modified bulldozer (or “killdozer,” as it’s been frequently called) that featured bulletproof plates, video cameras and a .50 caliber rifle. [14], Defenders of Heemeyer's contended that he made a point of not hurting anybody during his bulldozer rampage;[1] Ian Daugherty, a bakery owner, said Heemeyer "went out of his way" not to harm anyone. The Netflix documentary "Tread" explores the melee. One could argue that Marvin Heemeyer was treated unfairly by the government, that he was run out of business by a larger company, and that what he did on “Killdozer Day” was simply what every other “little guy” dreamed of doing after getting pushed down by “the man”. The sheriff's department argued the fact that no one was injured was not due to good intent as much as to good luck. Although this list did not carry a label such as “targets” or “enemies,” it did list thirteen of the buildings that were damaged by his bulldozer. [4], In 1992, Heemeyer purchased 2 acres (0.8 ha) of land from the Resolution Trust Corporation, the federal agency organized to handle the assets of failed savings and loan associations, for $42,000 to build a muffler shop. The Killdozer: Marvin Heemeyer’s Homemade Vengeance Weapon. The interior of this makeshift tank was airconditioned, and guns peered out from gun ports. As the armor covered much of the cabin, a video camera was mounted on the exterior for visibility, covered by 3-inch bulletproof plastic. So, in early 2003, Marvin Heemeyer decided he had enough. The Netflix documentary "Tread" explores the melee. [1] Heemeyer's rampage concluded with his suicide, after his bulldozer became trapped in the basement of a hardware store he had been in the process of destroying. Science is one of his many interests, and his favorite topic. "[23], "Man who bulldozed through Colo. town is dead", "Granby Rampage Damage Expected To Exceed several Million", "Crews Begin Dismantling Granby Bulldozer", "Rampager was surprised his plans went unnoticed", "Rampages – Tanks, Bulldozers, Whatever You Got! "[23], "Man who bulldozed through Colo. town is dead", "Granby Rampage Damage Expected To Exceed several Million", "Crews Begin Dismantling Granby Bulldozer", "Rampager was surprised his plans went unnoticed", "Rampages – Tanks, Bulldozers, Whatever You Got! '” said Susie Docheff in an interview with the Sky-Hi News. Finally, he fashioned three gun ports and outfitted them with a .50 caliber rifle, a .308 semi-automatic, and a .22 long rifle. Organizing large-scale strikes ranges from difficult to nearly impossible for the trucking industry in its current form. [18], On April 19, 2005, the town announced plans to scrap Heemeyer's bulldozer. As late as 2011, Governor Owens's staff still vehemently denied considering such a course of action, but since then members of the State Patrol revealed that, to the contrary, the governor did consider authorizing an attack but ultimately decided against it due to the potential for collateral damage of a missile strike in the heart of Granby being significantly higher than what Heemeyer could have caused with his bulldozer.