known as Spanish Texas. But the people were HARLINGEN — Certainly one of the joys of living in the Rio Grande Valley is walking into your backyard and plucking a fresh orange or lemon from a tree. Filter industry select. In Januaruy 1959 he married Nancy Hardy of Ardmore, OK. His wife, Mary E. O’Brien, was laid to rest there as well. Valley Ag Insurance offers comprehensive coverage for all your insurance needs. From there it was carried to the West Indies by early settlers. “When you got inside his truck, you always had to pick up a grapefruit or orange or whatever fruit there was and toss it to the other seat,” she remembered, laughing. It will be the exclusive supplier of gift fruit for Sakowitz of Houston. With information provided by Joan Jones the formation of the Texas A&I Citrus Center is clarified. The Texas citrus industry was devastated by the December 1983 freeze, which destroyed more than 47,000 of the Rio Grande Valley's 69,000 acres of citrus, and subsequently by the December 1989 freeze which destroyed about 24,000 of the existing 35,700 acres of citrus. BROWNSVILLE, Texas – There was quite a buzz in the Rio Grande Valley in the 1920’s and it concerned citrus. We are committed to high quality and superior Texas-Style customer service that continues, just as our founder Bobby Bell expects it. 1953 It is this year that the Atchison Citrus Center opens for business. Many of the settlers Two devastating freezes in the 1980s, urbanization, marketing conditions and other factors drastically reduced the number of acres devoted to citrus in the Rio Grande Valley in South Texas… Associate members from Harlingen are Crown-Williamette Paper Co., Food Machinery Co., and Tri-Pak Machinery Service. Together, our growers produce more than 9 million cartons of fresh grapefruit and oranges each year and another 5 million cartons of juice fruit valued at over $100 million dollars. By the ‘80s, grove owners across the Valley would depend on his advice for maintaining their fields, and waited on his cue to start harvesting their fruit. The Texas citrus industry is almost totally located in the Lower Rio Grande Valley, with about 85 percent of the acreage in Hidalgo County, 14 percent in Cameron County and only about 1 percent in Willacy County. He was a Rotary Club member, past president of the Lions Club of Harlingen, and a deacon of the First Baptist Church. Part VI: The 1940s and 1950s see a mature industry though Mother Nature intervenes. His hands were always sticky, Gomez said, from all those grapefruit and oranges. Although the overall size of the industry has decreased to about 40 percent of that existing in 1980, the demand for premium quality Texas Rio Red grapefruit and Texas sweet oranges continues to weather the vagaries of the market. King in Spain. colony as a threat to Spain's claims in the territory from Germany and Czechoslovakia. The storm occurred six weeks after heavy rains caused a 25 to 35% loss in the cotton crop being harvested. As a result of the fact that no vast riches were Spain's King Carlos II, perceived the French “They were samples of all the groves he was managing and taking care of.”. 1958 The Texas Citrus Mutual is established to assist Valley citrus growers in numerous ways, one important one being the establishment of crop insurance. Almaguer, who was known as Chuy by his close friends, spent more than seven decades as a grove fieldman, taking on several citrus-care jobs in companies all over the region, companies like Golden Acres, Progressive Groves, and Mission Shippers, which is now owned by Healds Valley Farms. These are major citrus entities. Be specific and include as much information as possible. Anyone who wants to understand more about Texas citrus crops must know where the Rio Grande Valley is located, when citrus fruit is produced there, and the … as migrants poured into the cotton who had come in the early 1700s to spread Grande Valley State Scenic Park. family's heritage back to the land He manages 500 acres in citrus and sells under the Key Brand label. J. C. Bowen, The Citrus Fruit Industry of the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas (B.B.A. Chuy loved caring for citrus trees as much as he loved teaching about it. thesis, University of Texas at Austin, 1976). have resided in South Texas for at When he died in 1945, his body was buried at the mausoleum located in the Shary Chapel across from his house. If appropriate, please provide a clear, close up image of your subject (plant, insect, etc. The large building contained cold storage vaults, a shrimp processing plant, a citrus juice extraction plant, and a citrus peel dehydration plant along with Rio Freezer, Inc., cold storage. “This time of year, like every year, the Mexican fruit fly is an issue in the Rio Grande Valley,” Eleisha Ensign, public relations director for Texas Citrus Mutual, said. By the end of the 18th century there were HARLINGEN — Certainly one of the joys of living in the Rio Grande Valley is walking into your backyard and plucking a fresh orange or lemon from a tree. beginning to feel far removed from the some forms of agriculture, such as raising There may be good potential for small acreages of so-called specialty citrus, particularly some of the tangerines, tangelos, lemons, limes, pomelos, and others. All those groves being gone saddened Chuy. Together, our growers produce more than 9 million cartons of fresh grapefruit and oranges each year and another 5 million cartons of juice fruit valued at over $100 million dollars. Write CSS OR LESS and hit save. J. L. Boggus of Harlingen is its first president. 54,300 SF interdisciplinary engineering building. AgriLife Extension's online Bookstore offers educational information and resources related to our many areas of expertise and programming; from agriculture, horticulture, and natural resources to nutrition, wellness for families and youth, and much more. and launched 10 expeditions trying to locate on his second voyage to the "New World" in 1493. 1/30/59 a severe freeze destroys 3 million of the Valley’s 12 million trees. Upcoming Workshops - South Texas Urban Stream Restoration Training, February 20, 2020, 8:30 am-4:00 pm at the Camer…, Friend to Friend – Staying Healthy Together, Texas A&M Agrilife District 12 Youtube Channel, Texas A&M Coastal Bend Health Education Center, Texas A&M School of Public Health – McAllen Campus, USDA – Weekly Texas Crop Progress & Conditions, Sheep shearing school set Jan. 4-7, accepting applications, Unique process ‘cleans’ crop water runoff when using dairy manure as fertilizer, Protect your home from fires over the holidays, Texas 2020 Rodent Academy goes virtual Dec. 1-2, Free webinar on youth suicide to be offered Dec. 3. Robert Cavelier de La Salle established Ft. St. Texas Citrus Mutual has represented the interests of Texas citrus growers since 1958. When, in 1974, Alberti shutters its doors and a year later Western Shellfish at 708 N. Commerce does also, Cecil Carruth is left with his largely useless Harlingen Cold Storage Building at 804 North Commerce. The Citrus Center originated in the mid-1940s when a group of local citizens and citrus growers approached the then Texas College of Arts & Industries, Kingsville, with the idea of establishing a research and training facility specializing in citriculture for the Lower Rio Grande Valley. In the late ‘50s, there were about 12 million citrus trees in the region. “He just had a real knack for the agronomics of growing citrus… Probably at one point, he had been in every grove in the Valley.”. The Texas citrus industry is almost totally located in the Lower Rio Grande Valley, with about 85 percent of the acreage in Hidalgo County, 14 percent in Cameron County and only about 1 percent in Willacy County. Ft. St. Louis. In 1974 and 1977 a total of 62 additional acres adjacent to the South Research Farm are purchased through the A&I Development Foundation. The day before he was admitted to the hospital because of chest pains and low blood pressure, he did what he’d done nearly every day since the late ‘40s: he drove around in his truck, checking on the trees. This part of the state offers Texas citrus growers a climate amenable to producing their crops and allows for the production of a wide variety of fruit. Their house, which is now where a Walmart stands, was surrounded by groves. In November 1967, owners Mr. & Mrs. John Atchison Jr. will open a new facility on Business 83 near FM 800. With warm breezes from the Gulf of Mexico, rich delta soil, and some of the world’s most sought-after citrus, it’s no wonder the first residents of the Rio Grande Valley called it magical. Citrus was in existence in the common … Mexican States 1824 Constitution. Homes sustained frozen and busted pipes. The Texas citrus industry is almost totally located in the Lower Rio Grande Valley, with about 85 percent of the acreage in Hidalgo County, 14 percent in Cameron County and only about 1 percent in Willacy County. 1946 This year the journal that will become the Subtropical Agricultural and Environments Journal of the Rio Grande Valley Horticultural Society (formed in 1947) starts publication with Proceedings of the Annual Lower Rio Grande Valley Citrus Institute, and in 1948 as the Proceedings of the Annual Lower Rio Grande Valley Citrus and Vegetable Institute. The area north of the river was a sparsley 1960s The Jones-Collier Foundation helps to finance the purchase of the 200 acre South Research Farm for the Citrus Center of Texas A & I.