Thank you. The flaky, layers of super thin dough, shaped into a horn and filled with a scrumptious filling. I don't have (and never had) a video of sfogliatelle recipe, so my final photos and my step by step (super thorough) instructions pictures are what you really get when you make them. 7-8 inches wide (photo 19). If you are short on time you can place it in the freezer for about an hour. Using your thumbs and a rotating motion push the center of the slice out opening up dough layers and forming a cone shape. Preheat oven to 200 C / Gas 6. Some might say that they’re also known for being complicated to make and even complicated to explain the whole preparation process. Cover dough with cling film when not working with it. If you don’t have a food processor just use a hand-hold or standing mixer. Found another recipe with pate choux like another reviewer said worked beautiful. Prepare lard at room temperature or melted butter. Sfogliatelle is an iconic dessert made of super thin layers of crunchy dough filled with delicious orange and cinnamon flavored ricotta cream. Wrap dough log in the parchment sheet and wrap entirely with cling film; refrigerate for 2 hours. The dough[4] is stretched out on a large table,[5] or flattened with a pasta maker,[6] then brushed with a fat (butter, lard, shortening, margarine, or a mixture), then rolled into a log (much like a Swiss roll, but with many more layers). Past that time divide the dough in 3-4 parts. They come frozen and ready to bake. Take the sfogliatelle dough log out of the fridge and while it’s still covered with a plastic wrap gently but firmly squeeze and stretch it with your hands going from the center towards the sides. Bring up to the boil, then whisk in the semolina flour until thickened and smooth. Constantly stirring slowly add semolina. © Copyright 2020, All Rights Reserved | Italian Recipe Book | Trellis Framework by Mediavine. Recipes for the dough and filling vary. Sfogliatella means "small, thin leaf/layer", as the pastry's texture resembles stacked leaves. This recipe should make about 12 quite large pastries, but could make more if smaller – just keep an eye on them whilst baking as they may cook more quickly. And not only for sfogliatelle but for ALL things pasta and pastries that require thin and equal rolling. Pasquale Pintauro, a pastry chef from Naples, acquired the original recipe and began selling the pastries in his shop in 1818.[3]. Super thin layers of crunchy dough filled with delicious orange and cinnamon flavored ricotta cream. Boil 240ml water and stir in the sugar. In a stove-top pot add milk, butter, salt and sugar. I also recommend stopping the machine a couple of times as the dough sheet comes through and roll it up onto the rolling pin. To form the sfogliatelle cone, take a dough slice and start gently working it with your fingers.Using your thumbs and a rotating motion push the center of the slice out opening up dough layers and forming a cone shape (photos 25-28). You can baste the pastries a couple of times with the leftover butter and lard mixture during baking, if you like. Grazie! Cut cylinder of dough into 1cm slices; you should have 16 to 20 pieces. Thank you. but it saves you a ton of energy and time and at the same time giving a better quality pastry. Add candied oranges, cinnamon and vanilla extract. To form the sfogliatelle cone, take a dough slice and start gently working it with your fingers. Add flour and salt in a mixing bowl, give a stir, add honey and lukewarm water. Holding sfogliatella in one hand fill the cavity of the cone with ricotta cream (photo 29). Grease it all over with remaining lard/butter, cover with a plastic wrap and place in the fridge for at least 2 hours or better yet overnight. The Secret For Making Authentic ITALIAN SFOGLIATELLE - YouTube Brush the dough with the butter-lard mixture. Mix well with your hands or in a stand mixer until you get a slightly crumbly dough (photos 3, 4). These Italian pastries are often known as 'lobster tails' in reference to their shape, and require a little effort to roll and wrap the pastry into the beautifully thin and crisp layers. Pass the dough at least 3-5 times repeating the folding process, until you get a smooth and even sheet. Repeat with all four pieces. Mix well with your hands or in a stand mixer until you get a slightly crumbly dough. Take one part and keep the rest of the dough covered to prevent it from drying. In Neapolitan cuisine, there are two kinds of the pastry: "sfogliatella riccia" ("curly"), the "normal" version, and "sfogliatella frolla," a less labor-intensive pastry that uses a shortcrust dough and does not form the sfogliatella's characteristic layers. The pastry is baked[8] until the layers separate, forming the sfogliatella's characteristic ridges. Place the first sheet of pastry on the parchment. This delicious pastry with a rich ricotta and orange peel filling, sometimes called lobster tails, was originally prepared only for the Italian aristocracy during the Renaissance. A sfogliatella (Italian pronunciation: [sfoʎʎaˈtɛlla], plural: sfogliatelle), sometimes called a lobster tail in English,[1][2] is a shell-shaped filled Italian pastry native to Campania. Oops! Lay the third dough sheet on the parchment, overlapping the second sheet and brush with the butter mixture. Divide the dough into four pieces and flatten. Line a baking tray with baking parchment. You can use your hands if using lard or painting brush if using melted butter. The cream is thick enough to hold in the pastry. It's a challenging recipe that requires a lot of time and some special techniques but so worth it! Like to stretch the dough so thin it almost tears, to use ALOT of shortening in between layers they were a pia to form cones and they were hard as rock! While processor is running, add egg yolks, one at a time, until fully combined. Mix with a whisk and set aside. Bake in preheated oven until dough turns golden brown and starts to 'peel' back from the pastries, 20 to 30 minutes.