A new working relationship would also be necessary between neighbouring practices if they are to continue to provide the range of services and out of hours cover that farmers will need, believed Leicestershire practitioner Peter Orpin. In animal treatment, current experimental methods such as organ transplantation and stem cell treatments could become routinely used, Dr Jackson predicted. However, these changes in the structure of farm animal practice must be properly handled by the profession, its clients and government. How do we change working practices to accommodate different needs of the workforce? And how do we encourage the next generation of leaders who will carry the profession forward? Website designed in the UK by dpc.agency, Advice for farm vets and ambulatory equine vets, BVA Young Vet of the Year 2020 finalist: Nat Scroggie. But I also want to record my appreciation for everyone that took time out to attend and contribute to the various debates. And should disputes arise over veterinary fees there will be an independent body in place to act as mediator, suggested veterinary consultant Dr Eric Jackson. 24/7 specialized referral centres will continue to proliferate, as long as their economics support their growth, which will likely be the case. Veterinarians will continue to complain about demanding pet owners, even though it is those same owners who are driving the growth in their industry. "Market forces alone may produce a system of change without progress with higher disease risks, poorer welfare and reduced overall veterinary service if this is not managed well," he warned. How does the profession engage with the changing demographic? They will also be able to charge a realistic professional rate allowing them to provide better salaries for themselves and their support staff. I advise the public to keep watching also. Formerly, business development manager of the Specsavers Optical group, Mr Watson pointed out that the challenges facing the veterinary profession were often very similar to those experienced by other healthcare professions like opticians. by 01 July 2010 ... it will be the issue of Official Veterinarians(OVs). are suggesting that each year more and more veterinary graduates will work in the area of companion animal medicine. what does the future hold for veterinary medicine? You did just that and I hope it gives you an appetite to further explore and contribute to the wider political issues that flow through our profession. 27 June 2006 Veterinary practice in the next generation will be no holiday camp - but it will be a place where a well trained and properly remunerated multidisciplinary team provides high quality care using the best available technology, according to speakers at a meeting organised by the RCVS on 16 June 2006. In short, not a whole lot will change for the public. It is likely that the wealthier pet owners will continue to spend exorbitant sums of money on their pets, while owners with less financial resources will be increasingly encouraged to purchase pet insurance, if unexpected emergencies arise for their animals. Many currently available technologies will be adapted for use in the veterinary field - global positioning systems will be used to trace and identify individual animals, and mobile camera phones will transmit images for vets to make an initial diagnosis at many miles distance. Many studies are suggesting that each year more and more veterinary graduates will work in the area of companion animal medicine. Less and less general veterinarians will continue to provide out of hours services and pet owners will continue to grumble about high veterinary bills, while shelling out even higher amounts on a regular basis. Veterinarians will continue to complain about, pet owners, even though it is those same owners who are driving the growth in their industry. However, veterinarians will have to deal with the effects that the corporatization process will have on their profession, just as the field of human medicine had to deal with the advent of for profit HMOs in the USA, decades ago. There will be more specialization within the profession and increasing use of technology and advanced procedures. Vet Futures. He predicted that some of the solutions will also be similar, highlighting the transformation of the optical market over the past 30 years with the emergence of corporate chains. There will be more specialization within the profession and increasing use of technology and advanced procedures. 11 Dec 2014 For tailored content in your inbox and online, as well as access to our journals and resource and support services you might want to consider joining BVA. A good place to start is to give us your views on the Council papers which are out now in the WHAT DOES THE FUTURE HOLD FOR VETERINARY MEDICINE? P2/The role of companion animals in our society. However, in the coming years greater public acceptance of the value of pet insurance will allow veterinarians to continue raising standards of veterinary care. If left unchecked, the trend would result in the intake of veterinary schools becomingly increasingly dominated by the offspring of well to do parents, he said. Pet food won't get any cheaper, pet accessories will become even more expensive, and our innumerable companion animals will continue to. Many studies are suggesting that each year more and more veterinary graduates will work in the area of companion animal medicine. P3/ The Corporatization of Veterinary Medicine. P11/ What’s your pet worth under the Law? British Veterinary Association is registered in England No 206456 at 7 Mansfield Street, London, W1G 9NQ. As I’ve mentioned before, my theme for the year is “Driving Change – Shaping the Future” and this project meshes exactly with that vision. He foresaw the current decline in the numbers of farm animal practitioners levelling off in the future. Charging a proper rate for their professional services will also be essential for the future survival of farm animal practice, particularly in view of the changes underway in veterinary medicines distribution, observed Jonathan Long, Livestock Editor of Farmers Weekly.