Case Study: The Calamitous 14th Century During the Late Middle Ages, roughly the fourteenth and early fifteenth centuries, medieval civilization declined. The Black Death – a combination of bubonic, septicemic, and pneumonic plague (and also possibly a strain of murrain) – had been gaining momentum in the East since at least 1322 CE and, by c. 1343 CE, had infected the troops of the Mongol Golden … Black Death, pandemic that ravaged Europe between 1347 and 1351, taking a proportionately greater toll of life than any other known epidemic or war up to that time. Notwithstanding these ecological calamities, the population of northern Europe was at an all time high by the second quarter of the 14th century. By the 14th century, however, the weather had begun to cool slightly. The Black Death is widely thought to have been the result of plague, caused … [citation needed] West Africa and the Indian Subcontinent experienced economic growth and prosperity. This timeline is a chronology of the spread of the Black Death that reached Europe in the mid 14th century killing around 50 million people – possibly as many as two thirds of the population. The plague came to Europe from the East, most probably via the trade routes known as the Silk Road overland, and certainly by ship oversea. The crisis in agriculture and its consequences From the middle to the end of the 14th century, Europe was struck with the devastating pandemic of the Black Death — the bubonic plague — which in the short span of 1348–1350 wiped out fully one-third of the population. ... 14th Century (1301 to 1400 CE) | 16th Century (1501 to 1600 CE) This holds that the earth is the center of the universe and that all heavenly bodies revolve around it in perfect circles. As a means of recording the passage of time, the 14th century was a century lasting from January 1, 1301, to December 31, 1400. 1315 signified a turn for the worse, and one year of bad weather sent Europe spiraling into one of the worst famines in European history. However, the arrival of the Black Death, in Europe in 1347 pushed the European population into a century-long demographic decline and caused long-term changes in economy and society. It is estimated that the century witnessed the death of more than 45 million lives from political and natural disasters in both Europe and the Mongol Empire. France - France - Economy, society, and culture in the 14th and 15th centuries: The long war against the English, fought almost entirely in France, benefited few but the captains and peculators; it injured almost everyone. Despite persecution, records of homosexual relationships during the Medieval period did exist. The growth experienced in Europe between the 11th and the 13th centuries resulted in a profound crisis during the 14th century.There were three calamities suffered by the population: hunger, war and plagues. In contrast to the vigor of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, the fourteenth century was burdened by crop failures, famine, plagues, and reduced population. It seemed not to make too much difference aside from pushing spring thaw back a little and bringing harvest time earlier. 15th Century, 1401 to 1500. An earlier plague had hit livestock, and there had been crop failures from overexploitation of the land, which led to two major Europe-wide famines in 1316 CE and 1317 CE. In Medieval Europe, attitudes toward homosexuality varied by era and region.Generally, by at least the twelfth century, homosexuality was considered sodomy and was punishable by death. The 14th century CE in Europe had already proven to be something of a disaster even before the Black Death arrived. ... 1406 The geography of Ptolemy, an ancient Greek, is introduced in Europe. The 14th century was, both worldwide and in relations to England, a century of social turmoil, filled with plague, famine, and an unprecedented …